Tale of a Vandal Pen Collector: Edison Glenmont

When I discovered Brian Gray of Edison Pen had some old Sheaffer rod stock squirreled away, I stuck my name on my favorite piece: a brown marbled material known as “Amber Glow.” Sheaffer used this material, among other colors such as Jade, Crimson Glow, and Cobalt Glow, in the Balance II pen series, circa 1998.

Sheaffer Amber Glow fountain pen [modified from defunct Swisherpens.com website]
Sheaffer Balance II fountain pen in Amber Glow [modified photo found on archive.org]
It took me much, much longer to figure out which Edison pen to have made out of the Amber Glow, than it took for Brian to actually make the resulting fountain pen. Lots of overthinking on my part. At one point, the pen was going to have a Huron body with a Glenmont cap. I really, really like the section and barrel of the Huron in my hand. I avoided the Glenmont for a long time. I thought it might be slightly too fat in the barrel, and the section too short to be comfortable for me.

Further down the road, I had a chance to try a friend’s Glenmont, and was struck by how comfortable the pen was to write with. So much for assumptions, ay? Yes, an Edison Glenmont was finally chosen. After all, a classic brown marbled pen material needed a classic flat-top pen look.

Via email, I asked Brian if it were true about the Parker Duofold being the Glenmont’s inspiration:

…the Glenmont indeed started as being inspired by a Duofold, but really only in the sense that it was a flat-top, and I frequently made them with black finials, blind caps, and sections.

Edison Glenmont in Sheaffer Amber Glow and black acrylic ends
Edison Glenmont in Sheaffer Amber Glow and black acrylic ends
Edison Glenmont in Sheaffer Amber Glow
Edison Glenmont in Sheaffer Amber Glow

Beautiful, isn’t it? A very satisfying brown fountain pen. In my eyes, it invokes many of the vintage brown marbled pens I’ve loved, such as those by Chilton, Moore, Conklin, and  Leboeuf.

If you think the material looks familiar, and not just because of the Sheaffer Balance II, you might be thinking of the brown marbled Danitrio Cumlaude.

Edison Glenmont and Danitrio Cumlaude both in Sheaffer Amber Glow
Edison Glenmont and Danitrio Cumlaude both in Sheaffer Amber Glow

Well, look at that, ay? These pens are made from the same brown marbled material! Both all black, brown, pearly caramel, with hints of dark cherry.

Edison Glenmont and Danitrio Cumlaude both in Sheaffer Amber Glow
Edison Glenmont and Danitrio Cumlaude both in Sheaffer Amber Glow
You can see the threads that connect the black end piece to the barrel
I like that you can see the threads that connect the black end piece to the barrel

What’s This? Another Glenmont?

My long time love and I got married last year, or at least partially married in some U.S. states as of this writing. A sweet friend sent us a wedding gift in the form of an Edison Glenmont in Aztec Flake. The pen is engraved to us, and so it must be shared with my beloved wife. But, hey, I get to store it in my pen box along side its Edison siblings! And a friend is endeared to us even more with this lovely offering which commemorates an important occasion in our lives.

Edison Glenmont in Aztec Flake
Edison Glenmont in Aztec Flake

Coincidentally, I’d taken notice of the Aztec Flake material when Brian introduced it in the retail version of the Edison Pearlette. It’s wonderful when a material you’re curious about shows up on your doorstep, ay? There’s a lot of depth to the acrylic. The Aztec Flake is an impressive, complex material that photos here don’t quite capture. It’s all brown, yellow, orange, red, crazy handsome.

Edison Glenmont in Aztec Flake
Edison Glenmont in Aztec Flake
Edison Glenmonts left to right: Sheaffer Amber Glow, Aztec Flake
Edison Glenmonts left to right: Sheaffer Amber Glow, Aztec Flake
Edison Glenmonts
Edison Glenmonts

Some Nerdy and Not So Nerdy Info

The Sheaffer Amber Glow Glenmont is slightly shorter than the Aztec Flake Glenmont. The differences aren’t significant, but because the latter pen is more representative of a signature Glenmont, I’ll use the weights and measurements I took of my Glenmont in Aztec Flake:

Length capped: 146.76mm
Uncapped (nib to barrel end): 129.56mm

Weight (empty) capped: 21g
Weight (empty) uncapped: 11g

Weight inked as ED – capped: 24g
Weight inked as ED – uncapped: 14g

Ink ED Capacity: 3.5ml
Ink Converter Capacity: .7ml
Ink Cartridge (long – Waterman or Pelikan style): 1.5ml

The weight of an ED versus a cartridge or converter is kind of a wash. An Edison international converter weighs about 2 grams empty, and 3g inked up. A long international cartridge filled with ink weighs about 3 grams. A pen with higher ED capacity than the average 3 to 3.5ml pen will weigh more than a pen inked by cartridge or converter.

The numbers I share are only as accurate as my digital postal scale, and digital calipers. Your measurements may vary slightly, ay? Also, you can check the Edison Pen website which also has measurements for each pen. I encourage you to do your own weights and measurements because, hey, it’s fun! It’s been a great part of the process in getting to know my individual pens, and using that information, sometimes successfully and sometimes not, in evaluating what other pens may work out for me.

The nibs are #6 nibs with the Edison logo, in both 18K and steel. I like gold nibs, but more and more opt for steel nibs. They are economical, and get the job done. Um… is at least one of you besides me wondering about weight of gold and steel nibs? In regards to the #6 nibs used by Edison there’s no weight difference, in any of my own Edisons, to the pen using steel or gold nibs. Um… so, the weight of a #6 Edison 18K or Steel nib is approximately 2 grams.

Some folks say there’s no difference between gold or steel nibs. In my experience, there are differences writing with one or the other. They are nice differences, but not “this is good,” or “that’s bad” differences. The steel is very firm and steady, and the gold in the 18K Edison nib has a softness to it, and is often wetter than the steel version. Some materials, like the Sheaffer Amber Glow, simply call out for a gold nib. Order what you want, and what you can afford, for any given fountain pen.

The nib point sizes of my Edisons are mostly in Fine or Extra Fine. Yet I ordered a Medium nib for the Glenmont in Sheaffer Amber Glow. That M nib went to Deb Kinney for a stub grind. That’s a topic for a future post.

I’m grateful to the friend who lent me his Glenmont. My assumptions about it proved wrong, as the Glenmont is a great fit, and I love writing with it. Um, them. Both of them! In this case, two is not too many of the “same” pen at all. What a fortunate writer am I.

As always, thank you for reading.

Assumptions allow the best in life to pass you by.—John Sales

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7 thoughts on “Tale of a Vandal Pen Collector: Edison Glenmont

  1. Such a beautiful color! Love the way it glows in the light. I’ve always wanted to get a custom-made pen, although it is out of my budget. I think I can resort to drooling over yours for now.

    Congratulations on your marriage!

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    1. Save, save, save. All of my pens are outside my budget, my friend, yet here they are and I didn’t go into debt for any of them. Thank you for reading, and for your sweet congratulations. Awesome!

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  2. You know, I’m a big fan of the Glenmont. I had the same assumptions as you, at first. I thought it would be too big and wieldy, but it isn’t. I love to write with mine. Both of your pens are just gorgeous in their own right. I love the Sheaffer Amber Glow with black ends, and love the Aztec Flake which is comprised of only one acrylic. I have sampled the Aztec Flake in the retail Pearlette, and it is extremely attractive in person. Your photos do both pens justice in the photos. I confess that I have a little bit of Sheaffer Amber Glow envy. That is just a yummy acrylic. Congratulations on two fantastic pens, and thanks for sharing them with us. =)

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